Archive for the ‘Apocalyptic Stories’ Category

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Eri cannot believe that her best friend and protector was just collected by the Opprimere soldiers, that Kaynan has become another “tax of human life” for the empire.
As she fights with the soldiers, one of them gapes at her fiery hair and violet eyes, wanting to procure her as well, but that was not the order. His shock was due to the fact that Eri is practically a twin to her mother, a rebel force leader. Why was Eri not taken?
Her stepfather and stepbrother were collected three years prior leaving Kaynan as their provider and friend.  With Kaynan gone, Eri must hunt for meat, taboo for women in the Tolareean village of tree dwellers. She begs for information from the friendly, eldest woman of the village, Clarity. Increased village threats, and a hunger for answers to her mother’s and other family members’ disappearances lead Eri and Leah to hike to Imperii, the empire capitol.  They leave armed with a unique bow, Eri’s eagle necklace, their talents, and light camping gear.
Their quest takes them to a submerged Washington, D.C., a gigantic gulf, destruction of a large section of the Midwest, and southern Utah. An encounter with soldiers solidifies that going back home will never happen. The next city must be crossed even though there are obvious dangers and clever technology, which adds to the enjoyment of the read.
When a civilization falls changes invariably happen.  This Disaster does create a decline in language and an increase in superstitions outside of the privileged cities and classes.  Doctors are called “medicine men” for instance, and the taboos subjugate women. It also is the mother of inventions to help deal with new dangers and new needs.
Eridale was a typical teenage girl who had conflicts with her mother.  In this case it was exacerbated by her mother’s disappearance. Eri suffered from simplistic grudges and teen self-righteousness.  The conflict between an almost grown woman and her mother, who wants to parent a child who has been independent for years, is a real phenomenon.
 I liked Melanie’s word choices, of which “my body halts,” “tax of human life,” and “entrenches my resolution” are a few.
Not being familiar with either, I could feel her familiarity with archery and land formations of the southern Utah national parks, very clever natural fortresses.The map was intriguing and I hope that the final graphic can enlarge well in order to read the lettering clearly.
Dystopian novels give the writer full creative rein, and Melanie has chomped down on the bit to create strong female protagonists and a unique story among the forest of dystopian novels.  I look forward to the sequel; and by all mean, don’t let her shoot!
      
I volunteered to review an advanced reader’s copy of Storm Child.  Joan Enders
Storm-Child-web

 

Melanie is an author, designer, photographer, and flight attendant all rolled into one. She has told stories all her life and finds her passion in sharing the plots that spin through her head. She now lives in Portland, Oregon, with her two dachshund-chihuahua dogs. She loves the beauty of the Pacific Northwest that feeds her imagination.

When no one is listening, Melanie loves to belt Broadway songs in her living room and car. Someday she hopes to be on a flight where someone is reading her book.
Connect with the Melanie here:
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To view the blog schedule  for STORM CHILD and follow this tour visit the Official Event Page: 
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It has been four years since The Maze Runner was published, and to this day, all 12 of  my library’s copies are checked out with “holds” on the book.  The two sequels, The Scorch Trials and The Death Cure, are going home with students who will be buying antacids at the local  stores.  Such tension-filled books!  There is no relief in the prequel to the trilogy.

Sun flares have scorched the earth and melted people.  Our teen hero and heroine, Mark and Trina, are surviving as best they can.  They join forces with a no-nonsense military man, Alec, who saves their hides so many times that they will never pay him back.  There are horrors everywhere in New York City, and they finally find a way to escape to the Appalacian Mountains hoping that the countryside is cooler and calmer.  Instead they land in the middle of the kill order that makes no sense, and that goes extremely wrong, which you will understand upon reading.

If you want a fluffy read, John Dashner is not your author and this book will not be your pleasure.  If you can handle dystopian dysfunction, mayhem and disease, read on!  It is riveting.

Have I mentioned that Lauren is one of my fave authors?  And how does she speed-write?  But on to the book YOU. MUST. READ.

Lena finds herself moving toward revolution with the other citizens of the wilds, infiltrating and sabotaging.  Meeting the underground people who were the rejects of those above was a moving part of the novel.  I kept thinking there was something else brewing as Lena begins her relationship with Julian.  The surprise ending was ruthless and miraculous at the same time.  I found it incredulous that someone could survive the onslaught of  Delirium.  This was a bridge novel and I cannot wait for the next.  I do have one question:  Is the Northeast USA covered with succulent flowers as depicted on the cover?

Lauren’s Website

Stephen, his dad and grandpa live as scavengers in a devastated America is scourged by a vicious virus that wipes out the vast majority of the population. They roam the country finding materials to trade in
order to live. His mother has died, and now he and his father just buried his grandpa, a ruthless man whose abuse lives beyond the grave. After attempting to save a woman and her child from slavers, his father is in a coma and Stephen has to trust the people of Settler’s Landing, a secret and enclosed community of survivors who live in deserted mansions surrounding a resort. Jenny, a Chinese and adopted daughter of the village healer, along with Stephen, strategize a prank that precipitates a war with a nearby enclosed community, with a dash of slavers mixed in. The reader will not be able to predict the ending, but can try.  I did find it refreshing that there were no zombies or teen lotteries in this apocalyptic adventure story.  It would make an interesting pairing with Sir Terry Prachett’s Nation.  This is a debut novel.

Jeff’s Website